Tag Archives: Failure

The Mindset of Grit: Learning & the Brain Conference Fall 2018

Learning and the Brain Conference in Boston this weekend examined the science of human potential, passion, talents and grit. Bringing together researchers, authors, and experts in their fields, the conference states:

By studying child prodigies, savants, and great innovators like Benjamin Franklin and Albert Einstein, scientists are trying to answer the complex questions of human potential: What makes a person a “creative genius”? Is “greatness” the result of innate talent or practice? 

The conference kicked off on Friday with sessions on personalized learning, problem based learning, digital learning, mindfulness, the science of innovation, and personalized learning. Keynotes included Scott Kaufman, PhD addressing Personal Greatness and Gail Saltz, MD speaking about the power of difference, Robert Sternberg, PhD spoke about teaching for wisdom, intelligence, creativity, and success and Ransom Stephens, Phd addressed Your Pursuit of Greatness. Sunday’s keynote, Sir Ken Robinson, PhD was titled,  “You, Your Child, and School: Teaching to their Talents, Passions, and Potential.”

My mind is spinning with the amount of greatness and learning buzzing at the conference. Here are a few key take aways to reflect and act on based on this experience in Boston.

“Outliers in the distribution of human achievement, they are not just a bit better than most at their chosen vocation, but dramatically so. . . We are not born knowing how to write a sonnet or flip an omelet. On the contrary, human expertise, at all points in the distribution—including the far-right tail—is acquired.” – Scott Barry Kaufman and Angela Duckworth

“Attaining a certain level of expertise in a given domain gets you in the door and starts your career. It puts you on the playing field among others who have put in the time, effort, and commitment to building up the necessary exper- tise base. Yet to rise to the very top of a creative domain — to achieve true greatness — seems to require even more (and average of 10 years more).  – Scott Barry Kaufman

The availability and use of technology has impacted student attention, working memory, and thinking.

“Personalized learning to me is student inquiry and investigation guided by teachers who carefully craft the learning process.” — Angela Townsend

“In personalized learning, a teacher defines and establishes clear learning objectives but provides students a variety of way in which to achieve these. It requires a teacher to relinquish control and expectations for linear, and uniform learning.” — David Ruiz

“The power of teachers isn’t in the information they share, but in the opportunities they create for students to learn how to learn, solve problems, and apply what they learn in meaningful ways.” – Katie Martin

The testing culture has soaked up billions of taxpayer dollars with no real
improvement in standards. Achievement levels in math, science, and languages
have hardly changed, and neither has the international ranking of the United States
in these disciplines.

By most criteria, Finland has one of the most successful education systems in the world.
Much of its success is due to the commitment and expertise of its teachers. Teaching is
a highly respected profession in Finland, and there is intense competition to join it. What
Finland shows is that rather than tempt those with the highest academic qualifications
into teaching, it’s better to design initial teacher education to attract people who have a
natural passion and aptitude to teach for life.

Sir Ken Robinson

Failure is where the new knowledge comes from, if you fail, you will keep going and ask different questions and get better. Keep pushing. Failure motivates people to be great. – Xiaodong Lin

“Our job as teachers is not to “prepare” kids for something; our job is to help kids learn to prepare themselves for anything.” – AJ Juliani

 

 

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Integrating Literacy & Physical Education

This week I went to the National September 11 Memorial and Museum to see the special exhibit “Come Back Season” about the influence of sports post 9/11. The museum states,

“Comeback Season: Sports After 9/11,” a special exhibition at the 9/11 Memorial Museum, explores how sports and athletes helped to unite the country, consoled a grieving nation and gave us a reason to cheer again following the 2001 attacks.

This exhibition illustrates many iconic moments — such as former President George W. Bush’s first pitch during a World Series game at Yankee Stadium and the New York Mets’ Mike Piazza’s dramatic, two-run home run during the first professional baseball game in New York City after 9/11 — as well as previously untold stories that highlight the unifying force of sports in American life. Acknowledging that the world would never be the same, sports provided the opportunity for escape, healing and relief.”

I was moved throughout the exhibit by the photographs, artifacts, and letters that showed how all the major league teams displayed patriotism, support, and unity immediately after the events of 9/11. It is an interesting question, When should the games go on? Looking to history, the NFL played a game two days after Kennedy’s assassination – a regret from the NFL Commissioner, Pete Rozelle at the time. After Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt “assured the baseball commissioner that sports can boost public morale.” The major league baseball teams did not play until almost two weeks after 9/11.

In the exhibit I read a letter written by the daughter of one of the pilots killed in the plane hijacking to Derek Jeter, then baseball player on the New York Yankees, about how much her father looked up to him and the horrible time her family is going through. Derek Jeter invited her and her sister to attend a Yankee game and they still keep in touch today. To see the hats, helmets, jerseys and equipment with the first responders names and insignias on the uniforms shows the respect that professional athletes paid to those who lost their lives and gave their time at Ground Zero. There was recognition for victims of the tragedy while patriotism and solidarity for America was celebrated immediately after 9/11.

I teach a college course titled Literacy in the Content Areas and every semester I have one ore more Physical Education students taking the class. My objective is to help illuminate the connection between literacy and physical education. Literacy in its simplest form means the ability to use language to read and write. In an article for PE Central, Charles Silberman writes, “As physical educators it is now our responsibility to integrate components of literacy into our classrooms. This does not mean we become reading teachers—that would be counterintuitive. This means we take critical elements of the new definition of literacy and seamlessly integrate them into our daily teaching. We do this to not only support the holistic growth of the child but also to help them obtain the knowledge needed to understand what a healthy life is and how to lead one.” PE teachers can infuse literacy by including a story in the game or activity, have students brainstorm what they already Know – What to Learn – and Learned about a specific sport or health concept (recording answers on a large KWL Chart, another activity is to have students select three tactics from a list and explain in writing what each tactic is and how each tactic contributes to successful game play. In James and Manson’s Physical Education: A Literacy Based Approach, “There are several content area literacy strategies that physical education teachers can use to promote the learning of physical education content as well as promote literacy skill development at the same time. These strategies include cooperative learning, graphic organizers, think-alouds, and integrating vocabulary into physical education instruction.”

Sports, physical fitness, nutrition and health are all around us. Using real world readings, videos, and text like the Come Back Season Exhibit at the 9/11 Memorial Museum brings to the forefront the integration of physical education and literacy in our everyday lives. Sports are great for debates, readings, addressing teamwork and character development, there is the history of sports, and even a big push to promote health and wellness.

Check out this video from NFL’s Nick Foles talking about failure and think how you can use this in your classroom as a teaching tool.

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