Tag Archives: Escape Game

Back to School Escape Room

180 Days and Counting . . . No, I am not counting but my students might be and I know I have many students who are NOT looking forward to coming back to school.

Why does the first day of school have to be typical with interest inventories and going over the class objectives and requirements? Bring some fun into the classroom with an escape room activity. Similar to a Breakout EDU, an immersive physical and digital game platform, an escape room contains both physical and digital puzzles for students to solve and “unlock.” An escape room requires teamwork, creative and critical thinking.

Using both physical locks and digital puzzles, students participate in an escape room the first day of class to showcase their knowledge of English Language Arts. I used quiz validation on a Google Form for students to curate their escape room clues and answers. Students work in teams to solve six different puzzles. First, the class is divided in three teams, each team will receive one of the puzzles that will lead to another puzzle or lock box. I am using both digital and physical locks for more options and engagement.

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  1. Using a pigpen cipher students decode different young adult book titles. I have placed these actual young adult books on display in my classroom. Inside one of these books a page is marked, the page number will unlock a small lock box that contain two additional puzzles.
  2. A blank plot pyramid is part of the next clue. Along with the blank pyramid, students will receive a bank with mixed up definitions of plot points: Conflict, Exposition, Falling Action, Resolution, and Rising Action. Students have to select the correct plot points in order to unlock this digital lock.
  3.  Using QR Codes, students view four different movie trailers and identify the types of conflict presented in each movie trailer.
  4. Comma or No Comma is a bank of sentences that students will have to decide which uses the commas correctly. Each box has a letter and the correct sentences spell a word that will unlock this digital lock.
  5. “The Mixed Up Files of Dr. Haiken” includes questions about the teacher for students to decode. From symbols (like the secret code below) to mixed up letters or numbers, students decode the answers. original-3078941-2
  6. Jigsaw Planet has free online puzzles for students to solve. On this site you can also create, play, share jigsaw puzzles and compete with other users. I have uploaded a picture for students to solve and answer a question about the image in the puzzle.

 

Escape Rooms can be fun and exciting for students and intimidating for teachers to create. Looking online, there are many examples and samples to model your own escape room activities. Mix easy and challenging puzzles to keep all students engaged. Map out the order of the puzzles students will complete and go through a dress rehearsal before the students give it a try to work out any kinks. Then, let the students escape. To build interest and engagement think of a storyline and start with a trailer to build excitement. And don’t forget to include fun in all aspects of the escape.

 

 

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Building An Escape Room Activity for the ELA Classroom

Ever since I participated in the Escape the Bus at ISTE 2017, I have been thinking how I can create an escape room experience for my students the first week of school. Already armed with Breakout EDU kits, I have been deconstructing the box to make the puzzles, ciphers, and locks bigger and more complex. Scouring blog posts and Pinterest for ideas and inspiration, I have created five puzzles for our Escape Game (based on seventh grade ELA material) to introduce the storyline of our year long game in eighth grade English.

First, students will view the iMovie trailer I created to set the story for the year. The future and the safety of the entire world hangs on students ability to unlock mysterious BOOKS and secrets they contain. Books are a guide where students, if they can, uncover and discover the secrets in a world where people can’t read.

Then, students will receive a puzzle piece to match them up to a specific group. Students will have to put their puzzle pieces together to find their group members. Students will be competing against each other and the top three teams with the highest score will gain XP.

One puzzle is based on a tic tac toe cipher or the pigpen cipher. Using the cipher, students will decode a list of books that I have read this summer, search the books along the book wall, and find the next clue hidden within one of the books.

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Sample Cipher Clue:Screen Shot 2017-08-09 at 8.57.39 AM

Within one of the book titles will be three numbers that will open a small lock box. Inside the small lock box are two more puzzles to solve about Plot & Climax. Students will have to match the correct elements of plot along the plot pyramid to open a number lock. This idea was inspired by Taylor Teaches 7th on Teachers Pay Teachers who has 8 different ELA based Escape Room Resources on TpT.

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Another puzzle includes using QR Codes to view different movie clips and for students to identify types of conflict presented in the movies. The order of the types of conflict help to open a directional lock using the key below.

Lock Paper Scissors has great ideas and resources for building an Escape Game. The Lego Puzzle box shared on the website caught my attention and I am commissioning my son to create two of these to use with the Escape Game. I will hide a book title or famous quote inside the Lego Puzzle Box for students to uncover another clue.

Another puzzle includes matching popular book titles with the correct plot summaries. Once students complete and match the correct titles and summaries, students will receive an envelope with a secret message written in invisible ink.

I still have three more puzzles to create. I am thinking about something related to punctuation, grammar, and prefixes and suffixes. Additionally, I might use a reading passage that has parts of it blacked out for students to answer questions. Adding music to set the tone is important. The key is that throughout this experience students are working collaboratively. Additionally, this gives me some insight to what my students already know and where to begin within my curriculum to meet learning targets.

Have you created an Escape Game for your classroom? I would love to know more. Share your insights and knowledge in the comment section of this blog.

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