Tag Archives: collaboration

5 Activities for Close Reading, Collaboration, and Discussion

David McCullough, author of John Adams and 1776, said during an interview on NPR, “To teach history, use pictures to fuel students’ curiosity.”

We want students to get into a text (whether a primary source or historical fiction) and get a sense what people experienced during other time periods.  Then, students fill in the text with what isn’t being said by sketching, improvs, writing. 

Creative activities help students walk in a particular time period and ignite student interest in the past. Teachers can bring new life to a unit of study by integrating the tools of creative drama and theatre – tools like pantomime, movement, improvisation, scripted drama, oral interpretation, debating, public speaking, readers theatre, storytelling, and the many other ways we use our body or voice to creatively communicate ideas to others. 

Content is what we teach, but there is also the how, and this is where literacy instruction comes in. There are an endless number of engaging, effective strategies to get students to think about, write about, read about, and talk about the content you teach. The ultimate goal is to build a student’s comprehension, writing skills, and overall skills in communication.

Here are five activities to do with your students to promote deeper comprehension, communication, and close reading.

It Says, I Say, So What? – This  reading strategy from Harvey Daniels helps students by guiding them through the process of drawing inferences from the written text. Also, it provides an opportunity to synthesize the information with prior knowledge. I have adapted this many times to include images for students to read closely and articulate what they see and then what does it make you think.

Image Detectives

Reading Detective

10 Questions – Another reading strategy that I employ with my students was adopted by Kelly Gallagher, author of several books. Students read a chunk of text, the first chapter of a novel, or a passage from a nonfiction text and then brainstorm ten questions they have after reading the text. These questions become a frame for further reading and discussion about the text.

IMG_5883

Speed Networking – This activity provides an opportunity for students to make connections and exchange a variety of ideas with their peers in a productive manner. A student and a partner will discuss a given topic for three minutes, then switch to a new partner and discuss again. The number of rotations will depend upon the time available and the topic. The three rules include: 1. Stay on topic, 2. Keep talking until it is time to switch, and 3. Talk only to the person across from you.

Write Around – Students read a passage or a chapter then write a question at the top of a sheet of paper. Students pass their papers to one another or post them in a gallery for everyone to write a response to the open-ended questions.

Student to Student Dialogue Journal – Rather than creating a T-Chart where students record passages they thought compelling and writing a response, there is space for students to share their responses to the students’ double entry responses. Padlet is a great digital tool to collect student response and summaries in the write around and dialogue journals.

And one more . . .

product_image

Mystery Envelopes – Hand small groups a mystery envelope with an index card inside that has a question for the group to answer. Working collaboratively, students formulate answers with evidence to support the text dependent question(s).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tagged , , , ,

Facilitating Collaborative Learning

“The world increasingly relies on people being able to work together to collaboratively solve problems.” — Dan St. Louis, Principal of University Park Campus School

Group work is an integral part of school and world culture. Through group work, students learn that there’s a diversity of valid perspectives, build comfort around using their own voices, and understand the value of accepting and building on the contributions of others. When facilitating group work in the classroom, teachers need to be actively involved and continuously help with team maintenance.

Once my students are put into groups, I have the create a team charter  in less than ten minutes that addresses the following:

Participation: We agree to….

Communication: We agree to…

Meetings: We agree to….

Conduct: We agree to…

Conflict: We agree to…

Deadlines: We agree to…

We cannot expect that all our students will get along and everyone will do their assigned job. So, I give my students access to a few resources that address collaborative group work and resolving conflict.

Here are a few resources I provide for my students:

Tom WuJec’s TED Talk “Build a Tower, Build a Team”

Coping with Hitchhikers and Couch Potatoes on Teams Adapted from Barbara Oakley

Implementing Group Work in the Classroom Centre for Teaching Excellence

Group work: Using cooperative learning groups effectively Vanderbilt Center for Teaching

Amy Edmondson “How to turn a group of strangers into a team”

 

After giving my students opportunity to explore these resources I then assign them a choice in how to explain and share their learning/understanding:

Choice A – Create a How-To document to provide your students direct instruction how to work through conflict. This How-To sheet is for students to follow, reread and refer to. Be sure to Provide specifics and 3 or more links to additional resources how to resolve conflict

Choice B – Create a Google Presentation with ten or more teamwork problems and possible solutions, particularly regarding conflict. In addition, provide 3-4 links to videos and articles how to resolve conflict

Before we give students a team project or assign group work, discussing and examining the complexities of group work can give students the tools and techniques to work better together as a team.  Having students share their products provokes discussion about inviting people to work together to solve big problems. This gives students vision and vocabulary to work collaboratively.

When students are working on a group project, I also have them design the group work rubric for students to grade themselves on how they worked in their group and how their group worked as a whole. Students identify the categories and criteria to develop these rubrics and then we all come to an agreement which one to use as the grading rubric for the final project.

Lastly, students complete a group work processing questionnaire created on Google Forms for students to answer reflection questions.

Group Work Processing Questionnaire

How do we make sure that teaming goes well? Discussing the elements of group work, collaboration, and continuous team maintenance helps provide students with models of teaming that works. Then, the results for collaborative group work can be awesome.

 

 

 

Tagged , , , ,

Education Evolution

The majority of classrooms need to change from a physical and technology stand point. Classrooms need to incorporate more collaborative work among students and integration technology in authentic, meaningful ways. Thank you to Edudemic for sharing this video. Fore more information about the creators of this video check out their blog.

Tagged , ,