Creating Quality Hyperdocs

Matt Miller (@jmattmiller) of Ditch that Textbook writes “a quality hyperdoc or hyper slide should: Share the day’s lesson and objectives, provide links to content, activities, and assessments, differentiate using those resources that provide students a choice over process and content, provide a common place where students can turn in work, and look good and seem well-themed” (2019).

I have been creating and using hyper docs (or playlists) with my students for a few years now and I love that they allow me to organize a unit or lesson in a clear fashion, front load student work so students can work at their own pace and even choose their own learning adventure. During remote learning, I have been using hyper docs weekly to give my students easy access to lesson material and interactive reading and writing experiences. On April 27th I blogged about the first week of a WW2  hyperdoc I created  and want to share how this reading inquiry has evolved in the past four weeks.

Each of the hyper docs has the same theme and format to indicate the unit. I added a screencast link to each hyperdoc to provide an overview of each element on the doc with specific directions students can access by clicking the “play button.” I have differentiated the unit allowing students to select their WW2 book, fiction and nonfiction choices.  As I reflect on this unit, I will add more differentiated options by product as well as content.

For Week One I wanted to build student’s background knowledge about WW2 and the Holocaust. I began with an anticipation guide on a Google Form and daily readings from Actively Learn. At the end of the week, students completed Hexagonal Thinking Maps (borrowed from John Meehan’s book EDredaline Rush, 2020) to make connections and show their understanding. Here are some examples of the completed work.

 

For Week Two, student began reading their independent reading books and I created a Podcast on Anchor for students to access a Read Aloud of Refugee by Alan Gratz in 30 minute blocks. My special education co-teacher has also been reading aloud and recording The Boys Who Challenged Hitler and posting on Google Classroom. Additionally, this hyperdoc provided two virtual field trips for students to explore Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Museum in Israel and the United States Holocaust Memorial and Museum in Washington, DC through Google Arts and Culture.  Students wrote reflections on Padlet and Google Forms.

During Week Three, students viewed an online production ofThe Diary of Anne Frank: A special presentation created by artists in isolation produced by The Park Square Theater in Minnesota, available online until May 24th, 2020.  Park Square was set to open its 21st production of The Diary of Anne Frank to over 12,000 middle and high school students when shelter in place orders took effect. When it became clear that there was no way to assemble to record the staged version, the cast began rehearsing and recording a Zoom reading of the play. It was released on April 21, Yom Hashoah, Holocaust Remembrance Day.

These virtual experiences have been vital to help understand this time period and see, hear, and experience the rich artifacts from history. Students also took a virtual tour to Anne Frank’s Secret Annex in Amsterdam and created their own concrete found poem based on the themes emerging in their independent reading books. Students responded in a Flipgrid the lessons learned from Anne Frank as we continue to self isolate.

Anne Frank Flipgrid Response

This week, as well finish up our WW2 independent reading books, students are looking and author’s craft and drawing larger text to world connections. I created a flipped lesson on Authors Craft and Style. I want students to look deep within the surface of their text. Proficient readers are continuously drawing connections between the text and the world, and I have students reading an article about the rise of Hate Groups in the US today to compare to the rise of hate and anti-semitism prior and during WW2. Next week, students are working on a One pager about their WW2 independent reading book. There are no tests or quizzes, only opportunities for students to share their learning and understanding.

When designing hyper docs I keep the following in mind:

  1. Engage: Hook your students, get them engaged, and activate prior knowledge.
  2. Explore: Resources, such as videos, virtual field trips or articles for students to explore more information.
  3. Explain: Simplify and clarify the learning objective for students. By creating a screencasts my intentions are to provide explicit directions students can return to at any time throughout the week for clarification.
  4. Apply: Students create artifacts to demonstrate learning through Google Forms, Padlet, Google Drawings, and Flipgrid.

 

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2 thoughts on “Creating Quality Hyperdocs

  1. Sue Hellman says:

    I’d like to share the hexagonal thinking map in an upcoming presentation, but the link in your Week 1 Board has been disabled. Would you mind sharing it? Thanks .

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