Celebrating Reading: Scholastic Reading Summit 2018

Scholastic Reading Summit Giveaways

Yesterday I had the pleasure of attending one of the five Scholastic Reading Summits happening around the country this July. The day was a celebration of reading and readers with teachers, administrators, and librarians committed to choice, advocacy, and matching students with powerful books that “nurture our souls, address our questions, learn about the world, transform our lives, and for pure enjoyment” (S. Harvey, 2018). Whereas schools are driven by test scores and prefabricated curriculum to help raise test scores, this summit was on the complete opposite spectrum. The theme and tone of the entire day was to teach readers (note that I did not say “teach reading”), and share book joy with ALL by giving students choice, access to great books, and time to read during the school day.

Consider the following:

“Reading build a cognitive processing infrastructure that then “massively influences” every aspect of our thinking, particularly our crystalized intelligence – a person’s depth and breadth of general knowledge, vocabulary, and the ability to reason using words and numbers” (Stanovich, 2003).

“Omnivorous reading and childhood and adolescence correlates positively with ultimate adult success” (Simonton, 1988). 

“Multiple studies have shown that avid readers demonstrate both superior literacy development and wide-ranging knowledge across a variety of subjects” (Allington, 2012; Hiebert & Reutzel, 2010; Sullivan & Brown, 2013).

The Scholastic Reading Summit was about encouraging lifelong readers and to give educators the tools that will foster their ability to support students as readers, to choose appropriate literature, and foster a love of reading; which in turn improves reading achievement.

The day began with the Book Whisperer, Donalyn Miller @donalynbooks and book enthusiast/librarian, John Schumacher @MrSchuReads having an Oprah moment, sharing new and soon to be released books with the crowd then giving them away to attendees.

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Co-author of the book From Striving to Thriving: How to Grow Confident, Capable Readers (Scholastic, 2018), Annie Ward, spoke about personalized instruction that enable striving readers to do what they need above all – to find books they love and engage in voluminous reading. Creating thriving readers means carefully carving out silent reading time that is supported with purposeful conferring. It means allowing children to choose what they read and saving intensive interventions for the 5% or so that truly need it. Most kids just need time to read what they love and find compelling. Ward showed pictures from her own school district and shared the transformation that occurred when the school mission was revised to create a robust independent reading life for ALL students.

There were two breakout sessions and smaller workshops — it was too hard to choose where to go or who to see. My first workshop was with Dr. Teri Lesesne @ProfessorNana on Examining Audience, Access, and Response: Middle Grade Does Not Equal Middle School. How do we build kids as readers – well, that was the buzz throughout the day. Lesesne addressed theories of adolescent development from Piaget, Maslow, and Kohlberg and then spoke about books as tools for understanding the development and needs of tweens and teens. Thinking about what could someone do to make you WANT to read before/after reading and what could someone do to make you HATE to read before/after you read, the following acronym was used to help match tweens and teens with the right books.

T – Trust
A – Access
R – Response
G – Guidance
E – Engagement (Joy)

T – Tellling the Difference

Lots of middle school and middle grade book titles were shared throughout the discussion to help students move across texts. My Amazon cart is overflowing with graphic novels and new YA literature to bring back to my classroom library. Note four new titles I picked up in the photo above.

Other breakout workshops included Creating an Independent Reading Canon for Black Boys presented by Dr. Kim Parker, Choice Leads to Advocacy led by Stacey Riedmiller, and Booktalk like a Wizard, Slay Reading Logs, and Champion Literacy presented by Dr. Brad Gustafson. Want to know what the best elements of a 30 Second Book Talk? Check out Brad and Jennifer LaGarde’s video:

The last session was presented by authors and illustrators Andrea and Brian Pickney. This dynamic duo talked about their writing process and then read aloud from some of their powerful picture books that are docu-poems and fiction unpacking difficult topics for young readers. Here is a video of both Andrea and Brian talking about the research, writing, and illustrators from their picture book Sit In about the Sit In Movement in the 1960s in Greensboro, NC.

Resources from the Scholastic Reading Summit are available on their website.

Now if you will excuse me, I have a stack of books that I have to get to, as summer time is a perfect time to catch up on reading!

 

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