No Tech Game Based Learning Activities

I work with some awesome teachers. One colleague, Kristie Orlando,  is a Spanish teacher who has a fun filled interactive classroom that promotes learning. Her students are actively engaged and enthusiastic being in her class. Today I got to sit in her classroom and see her in action. I got to see two action packed review games that she facilitated to help her students review for an upcoming test . This got me thinking about other “No Tech” games and kinesthetic activities teachers can do in their classrooms to energize classroom learning while at the same time reinforcing skills.  

The game I observed in Kristie’s Spanish classroom was GRUDGE Ball. The following directions are from Kara Wilkins’ blog To Engage Them All. Here is how to play:

1.Students were divided into five teams of four-five students each.

On the SMARTBoard was a slide with each team listed and 10 Xs under each of the teams.

On the back of the classroom door is a basketball hoop.

2.Each group gets a question.  If they get it right they automatically get to erase two X’s from the board.  They can take it from one team or split it.  They can not take X’s from themselves.

3. Before they take off these X’s, though, they have a chance to increase their ability to get the other teams to hate them.  They get to shoot a Nerf basketball into the basketball hoop.  There were two lines with masking tape.  One is a two point line while the other is a three pointer.

4. If the student shoots from the two point line and get it in, they can take four X’s off the board.  If they go from the three point line, and make it in, they can take five off the board.  If they don’t make it they still get to take the original two off the board.

The object of the game is to knock everyone else off and people are going to get upset but that is okay (hence the name GRUDGE ball).

Another game Kristie shared with me was Bazinga which I have adapted for my students using Classcraft points. The directions for the game below are from Simplifying Radicals Blog.

This game can be played with multiple teams. Each team starts with no points and earns one point every time they answer a question correctly.  If the team answers correctly they earn one point and choose a Bazinga card.  If they answer incorrectly, the question then goes to the next team.

Here is the breakdown of the different Bazinga Cards:

Cards about Points:

– (3) Erase one point from all other teams.

– (3) Double your score.

– (3) Take away two points from one other random team and give them to your team.

– (6) Add two points to your score.

– (3) Erase two points from one other random team.

Action Cards:

– (2) Randomly switch one player from each of the other teams.

– (2) Randomly have a player from the winning team go to the losing team.

– (2) The team with the least points must collectively do 10 pushups.

– (2) The team with the most points must collectively do 10 pushups.

The Bazinga Card:

Take Half of Every Team’s Score.

Particularly in middle school, students need to get up and move around. The next three “No Tech” games are ones that I have organized to help my students review course material, use their kinesthetic abilities, and work cooperatively.

Reviewing for a quiz or a test? Why not make it a Review Relay.  Divide the class into four teams Each team would have two beach pails about 20 or so yards apart or opposite sides of the classroom (just make sure to clear the desks to run from one end of the classroom to the other). Place all the review questions in beach pails on one end of the classroom.  Each team starts at the same time.  They pull out questions one at a time and work together as a team to answer them.  When the question is answered correctly they peel the tape off the back of the question and see if they got it right.  If they got it right they run and put the question into the other pail.  if they got it wrong they keep it with them (outside of the pail).  They can’t try again if they get it wrong because they will already have seen the answer.  This will put the pressure on them to get the right answer the first time and not guess.  When the runner returns the next question can be taken out.  The team who finishes first wins, unless they got questions wrong and another team got more questions correct than them.  

Make a Life Size Scrabble to review vocabulary and spelling words. Using 8 ½ X 11 paper, print enlarged Scrabble letters. The letters should be distributed as follows:

  • 2 blank tiles
  • 1 point: E ×12, A ×9, I ×9, O ×8, N ×6, R ×6, T ×6, L ×4, S ×4, U ×4
  • 2 points: D ×4, G ×3
  • 3 points: B ×2, C ×2, M ×2, P ×2
  • 4 points: F ×2, H ×2, V ×2, W ×2, Y ×2
  • 5 points: K ×1
  • 8 points: J ×1, X ×1
  • 10 points: Q ×1, Z ×1

Give each team the letters and have them spell out the answers to questions.

Lastly, I have had a few teachers share with me how they use Jenga in their classrooms. In my ELA classroom I created Literacy Jenga with questions about reading fictional texts. You can find the instructions to play Jenga on the Milton Bradley website. The questions that I have taped to the Jenga blocks are based on Bloom’s Taxonomy level of complexity. Questions ask about the setting and characters to sharing a different ending to the text. Students are working in small groups playing Jenga and answering the questions on the Jenga blocks to rebuild a tower.

To play, one player pulls out one block anywhere in the tower. Reads the questions out loud and answers the question to the group. That player re-stacks that block on top to create a new row.  Students switch turns repeating the first part of the directions. Players keep playing until the tower falls down.

There are great games to play with students to energize the classroom and keep students moving, boost brain power, and even improve memory.

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