Take 5: #NCTE14 Annual Convention Day One

It was an amazing first day at NCTE’s Annual Convention. I spent the day sitting in thought-provoking workshops and meeting a number of young adult and children’s authors. Below are some highlights and take-aways from Day One.

1. All great writers BORROW from one another.

Whether a published author or budding writer, good writers borrow ideas from other writers. If we want students to write like great writers, teachers must share with students exemplary models and mentor texts. Great authors borrow voracious vocabulary, style moves, strong voices, and literary techniques.  Surround young people with great books and amazing authors, and let them investigate, notice, and study the writers’ moves to encourage students to love writing and see the power of words.

2. REREADING is essential.

Author of The Writing Thief, Ruth Culham shared that every August she rereads To Kill a Mockingbird. She said she does this because she “always learns something new each time she rereads it and she hasn’t learned everything that the book has to offer.” I can attest to this myself as I am always learning something new and different when I read and reread a text multiple times. Teachers need to slow students down when reading and encourage them to read a text multiple times and search for the gems that writers leave behind in their texts.

3. Fold Away

If you are an weekly reader of my blog, you know that I use and create interactive foldables in my English classroom with my eighth grade students. I am not alone. Foldables are portals for teaching the what and why. They are more interactive than a worksheet, and they are wonderful tools to help chunk and scaffold information.

4. Looking in Awe at Each other

As much as teachers are in awe of authors, authors are in the awe of teachers. The young adult authors I met and heard in various workshops talked about teachers as the ones who encourage, inspire, challenge, and cheer both published authors and student authors. Make connections with authors and encourage students to reach out to authors on social media to share fan love and book love.

5. Engage With Others: Learn, Grow, and Collaborate

As schools continue to cut funding for effective professional development, teachers must take professional development and search out opportunities for professional growth. I am a teacher because I love learning as much as I love my content area. Everyday is an opportunity to learn, grow, reflect, and be a better teacher. Look around — professional development opportunities are all around us, and with the power of social media, we never have to stop learning, collaborating, rebooting, and reflecting.

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